Isaac Newton: The Last Sorcerer

By Michael White | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 11
Metamorphosis

Forward, forward let us range, Let the great world spin for ever down the ringing grooves of change.

ALFRED, LORD TENNYSON1

Newton's decision to leave academe and remove to London marked a complete metamorphosis in his career, and the city in which he was to remain for the rest of his life had gone through no less a transformation contemporaneously. The Great Fire of 1666 had consumed an estimated 13,000 houses and 87 churches, including the beautiful old St Paul's. Gone was the city of Shakespeare, Chaucer, Raleigh, Elizabeth I and Marlowe, and the material loss has been put at £10 million during a time when the city's annual income was £12,000.

But the task of rebuilding had begun almost immediately. By the time William and Mary were proclaimed King and Queen a little over two decades later, some 8,000 houses and more than three dozen churches had been built to replace the old. As early as 1671, John Evelyn could report in his diary:

Returning home, I went on shore to see Custom House, now newly built since the dreadful conflagration. Rebuilt Guildhall used for the Lord Mayor's Feast in November. The Royal Exchange and Blackwell Hall completed; halls for the Vintners, Drapers, Coopers, Parish Clerks and Skinners; repairs to the river stairs at Queenhithe, Trig Lane and the Old Swan. Work begins on four new churches, on the Fleet Canal, and, in Fish Street Hill, on the Monument to the late dreadful fire.2

The new houses and streets were of a totally different character to the old. Until the Great Fire, the city had been a mass of wooden

-255-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Isaac Newton: The Last Sorcerer
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Introduction - Truth Revealed 1
  • 1: Desertion 6
  • 2 - The Changing View Of Matter and Energy 29
  • 3 - Academia 43
  • 4 - Astronomy and Mathematics Before Newton 66
  • 5 - A Toe in the Water 82
  • 6 - The Search for The Philosophers' Stone 104
  • 7 - The Sorcerer's Apprentice 131
  • 9 - To the Principia 190
  • 10 - Breakdown 222
  • 11 - Metamorphosis 255
  • 12 - Old Men's Battles 294
  • 13 - A Question of Priority 325
  • 14 - Joining the Ancients 343
  • References 363
  • Index 387
  • Picture Credits 403
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 406

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.