CHAPTER FOUR
The Mexican Nation Is Composed of the Provinces

The title of this chapter encapsulates the essential core of Mexican federalism as it emerged in 1823 and as it was formulated in the founding document of the federal republic, the Acta Constitutiva of 1824. In the view of the elites who took over as the rulers of their home provinces and municipalities, the Plan of Iguala, and with it the moderated constitutional monarchy of Iturbide, proved deficient by not granting home rule to the provinces. Only after the Iturbide regime was in place did they see that it constituted Bourbonism with a Mexican accent. That was a surprise to them, and it took some time to rally around the minimal principles of a genuinely independent national legislature and a limited executive.

The historiography has not fully recognized how tremendously difficult were the problems of political organization facing Mexico after independence and after the end of the Iturbide monarchy and how innovative the solutions were. As Guerra sketches it, the newly independent Latin American countries faced two gigantic political challenges: to create a structure that would allow them to be independent, republican, and Catholic, something not even the French Revolution had succeeded in doing, and to found a political system that was representative in the absence of a tradition and a practice of representation, something the United States had not had to do because it possessed a tradition of representative institutions.1

Most of all, there was the challenge of creating nationhood. In the period of March to July 1823 there emerged in Mexico an overwhelming consensus in support of provincial self-government and political autonomy from the city that had exercised uninterrupted hegemony for three hundred years (and more) over the provinces. With growing certainty of their purpose, the provinces chose self-reliance, self-government, self-sufficiency, "liberty," (as many of them phrased it), and in the first and one of

-98-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Forging Mexico: 1821-1835
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.