Foundations of International Politics

By Harold Hance Sprout; Margaret Tuttle Sprout | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SEVEN

The Revolution in Science
and Technology

THE EXTRAORDINARY advance of scientific knowledge and its engineering applications was stated in the Introduction to be the key to our revolutionary age. Applied science has transformed and is still transforming every feature of the environment in which international politics is conducted. For this reason, the scientific and technological revolution provides the logical starting point in our examination of the foundations of international politics.

Technology is a term with many shades of meaning. The essence of most definitions is: the application of techniques to accomplish human purposes. The purpose may be production of goods and services, treatment of disease, or any other. Technology is sometimes called applied science. The term is also used rather loosely as a synonym for engineering.

Technology is embodied, figuratively speaking, in every man-made structure, be it simple or complex, temporary or enduring. Technology is represented in the design of processed foodstuffs and raw materials, in houses and household equipment, in farms and factories, in monuments and skyscrapers, in medicines and medical apparatus, in libraries and laboratories, in books and maps, hand tools and machine tools, military equipment and every other man-made structure. These objects compose, in the aggregate, a large part of the physical environment of modern man. The larger and more complex this component of a society's environment, the higher generally is the level of its technological advance.

But it is not with the products of technology per se that we, as students of international politics, are concerned. The structures acquire political meaning and significance only in the context of the human beings who make and use them. An early-warning radar apparatus, for example,

-213-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Foundations of International Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 734

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.