The Duke's Province: A Study of New York Politics and Society, 1664-1691

By Robert C. Ritchie | Go to book overview

9
Leisler's Rebellion

During August 1688 Sir Edmund Andros journeyed to New York and New Jersey to proclaim his commission extending the government of the Dominion of New England over New York and New Jersey. His arrival coincided with gay celebrations for the birth of the heir to King James. Bonfires lit the nights; free food and beer encouraged the people to join in the thanksgiving. 1 Andros had no intention of staying; accordingly, he appointed Francis Nicholson, a member of the Boston garrison, lieutenant governor in charge of the southern area of the dominion. Andros's old friends had additional reasons for thankfulness. John West, James Graham, and John Palmer acquired offices in the new government while Philipse and Van Cortlandt, among others, were raised to the dominion council. 2 The dominion had reached its greatest extent with the incorporation of New York and New Jersey. The imperial experiment was in its heyday with only one pressing problem, French intentions in the north. Andros was unaware that his greatest danger actually lay to the east where William, prince of Orange, displaced his father-in-law as king of England.


The Crisis

William and Mary landed in England in November 1688, at the invitation of Englishmen displeased with King James's administration and frightened by the continuation of a Catholic ruling family. News of the turmoil gradually filtered to the colonies and by 1 March 1689 secret dispatches were received in New York alerting Lieutenant-Governor Francis Nicholson to events in England. 3 He and the council kept the news a secret in New York while sending word to Andros. However, the Williamite invasion opened the floodgates of frustration in Massachusetts, inspiring a movement that put Andros and other

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The Duke's Province: A Study of New York Politics and Society, 1664-1691
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • List of Tables ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Introduction 3
  • Part I - The English Arrive 7
  • 1 - The Invasion of New Netherland 9
  • 2 - The Structure of Government 25
  • 3 - The Emergence of Political Issues, 1664-1673 47
  • Part II - The Divisions Appear 83
  • 4 - Once Again Dutch, Once Again English 85
  • 5 - Trade and Politics: the Recall of Edmund Andros 108
  • 6 - The Consequences of Social Change 127
  • Part III - Change and Crisis 153
  • 7 - The Experiment with Representative Government 155
  • 8 - The Reassertion of Central Authority: the Dongan Administration 180
  • 9 - Leisler's Rebellion 198
  • Part IV - Conclusion 233
  • 10 - A Time of Troubles 235
  • Abbreviations 243
  • Notes 245
  • Bibliography 285
  • Index 301
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