Race, Gender, and Work: A Multicultural Economic History of Women in the United States

By Teresa Amott; Julie Matthaei | Go to book overview

Chapter 11
SEEKING BEYOND HISTORY

"We seek beyond history for a new and more possible meeting." 1 --Audre Lorde

It is difficult to find concluding words for a project as broad, complex, and wide-ranging as this one. Here we sum up some of the basic themes and insights of the book, and offer some thoughts about how activists can build on the histories we have examined.


Women's Works: Essential and Diverse

The simplest lesson of this book is that women--of all racial-ethnic groups, ages, classes, and sexual preferences--have been essential to the development and reproduction of the U.S. economy. Few of the women we have encountered spent their lives in leisure; most worked from dawn to far past dusk to care for themselves and their families. In the colonial and nineteenth-century economies, women's household work was indispensable to the direct provisioning of their families' needs. Women also contributed to production of goods and services for sale to others through their labor in family businesses and through paid work performed in the home. The labor of enslaved African American women in the fields and homes of white Southerners was essential to the southern economy and to early U.S. economic growth. And women comprised a critical part of the growing wage- labor force: young girls produced the first factory-made cloth in the early textile mills, domestic servants helped care for and reproduce generations of children, women have taught youngsters in elementary and secondary schools, and clerical workers continue to be at the core of the communication and accounting network of the modern economy. Finally, women have given birth to and raised new workers, without financial compensation and with little social recognition.

Second, and equally evident, is the diversity of women's works not simply across history, but during any one period. While some women labored virtually around the clock, others lived in different degrees of leisure.

-349-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Race, Gender, and Work: A Multicultural Economic History of Women in the United States
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 434

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.