Politics and Ideology in the Italian Workers' Movement: Union Development and the Changing Role of the Catholic and Communist Subcultures in Postwar Italy

By Gino Bedani | Go to book overview

10
Unity: The Emergence of a Difficult Agenda

Changing Conceptions of Unity

The workers' struggles in the early 1960s forced the confederations to face the problem of unity. The first confederate encounters took place via interconfederate negotiations with the employers. Between 1962 and 1968 six such meetings resulted in agreements across a range of matters: equal pay for comparable categories of clerical workers; 'just cause' as a basis for dismissals; guidelines on reduction of staff; the assessment of the functions of internal commissions; and the fixing of minimum wage levels. But the success of the confederations in gaining concessions on these matters was due less to a unified strategy of demands than to the employers' anxiety to placate an increasingly militant labour force.

The period of economic crisis between 1964 and 1965 marked the dividing line between a phase in which united action was occasional and spontaneous and a further stage in which common strategic aims became urgent. In 1965 demonstrations were jointly organized to protest about the housing situation. Following discussions on economic planning, all reports to the Cnel from 1966 were jointly agreed by the national confederations. Things were on the move, but these indications of a growing desire for unity were part of a complex set of motivations which gave the concept of unity, at least in its initial stages, a variety of meanings.

The communist majority within the Cgil was the only component within the workers' movement which, from the beginning, conceived of the final objective of unity, or 'organic unity' as it was called, as a complete merger of the three confederations. In the early 1960s, however, this was not a feasible proposition. At a press conference in January 1960, for example, the Cisl General Secretary, Bruno Storti, declared his confederation's support for the creation of a sindacato democratico which would exclude the communist component of the Cgil. 1

____________________
1
Bianchi, Storia dei sindacati in Italia, p. 145.

-130-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Politics and Ideology in the Italian Workers' Movement: Union Development and the Changing Role of the Catholic and Communist Subcultures in Postwar Italy
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 365

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.