CHAPTER IV
Sentimentality + Practicality = Motive?

Why do they give, of time, of money, of self?
Is it to guarantee perpetuation of person
Through time, and space, and eternity?

Some say (one hates to tell it, but)
Some say, "They give to gain reward
Immediately, if not sooner."

Surely one can find within the distant and
Subtle reaches of the human spirit better
Motives than this weak and selfish thing.

Service to God; service to man.Only then
Service to self.This is, above all,
The innermost heart of voluntary welfare.

VOLUNTARY WELFARE has a heart.Many an enthusiast has said so. Many persons have gone on to charge that government welfare, replete with what is scathingly called "bureaucracy," does not have a heart.Do these propositions have universal validity? Will they pass muster on all occasions and in all instances? They will not.

Voluntary welfare workers, either salaried or unpaid, can be chilly, businesslike, and or even frighteningly automatic on occasions. Government welfare agencies, moreover, are now staffed with thousands of persons who by no stretch of the imagination can be labeled by critics "bureaucrats of social welfare." Receipt of a county salary check need not indicate that a social worker may prove more impatient than she would be in a private agency, although high caseloads might enhance such a trait.To volunteer one's services to a retarded children's nursery school does not guarantee that the volunteer will be effective, much less self‐ effacing. Those who do social work for pay cannot be separated arbitrarily from those who choose to work without salary—much as one separates sheep and goats! The fact remains, however, that the halo of humanitarianism is often conceptualized over the head

-80-

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