CHAPTER VI
Bone of Contention

I

There was a man who said, "I'll give
Just once—no more." He's dead now; killed
They say, from giving once—a day,
That is, all the livelong year.

II

There was a man who said, "I'll try
To bring a certain unity to giving
For noble purposes.Surely there must be
Some common meeting ground on which
Fund-raisers can unite." Alas
He found a resting place, poor soul,
Where slings and arrows of outraged
Humanitarians come no more.

III

There was a man who said, "There are
Many benefits in diversity.Why should
We give our independent souls to any of
Totalitarian bent? We'll fight it out
All summer—and all autumn, too." He's gone;
Dead of quota fever and pocketbook starvation.

IV

There was a child who said, "I thought
That people liked to give.And that we need but
Ask, and they would give of what they have."
He's grown, now, and he knows that
Childhood is a time for dreaming dreams.

VOLUNTARY WELFARE, to survive, must be adequately financed. How shall it be done? The idea of the community chest in an earlier day was to unify the fund-raising of local agencies—for that was about all there was at the time, although Red Cross, YMCA, the Scouts, and Salvation Army, among others, were national in organization and coverage.Yet their fund-raising was local for the most part, and most were quickly enfolded in the chest movement. But times changed.

-117-

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