CHAPTER VIII
United Fund-Raising
in the Grand Manner: Detroit

How, then, shall we raise the dollars that we need?
By asking every housewife? Surely that is not the
Way to do the job.Perhaps by entering the plant
And asking every worker, using methods modern,
Doing it just once—but right—the dollar flow will come.

Deep in paneled offices where suits are always dark,
We'll find big wheels with power to contribute
Dollars that once went to those who clip their
Solitary coupons.In the name of all that's good
In corporation management, we'll light our Torch.

What we cannot understand is why it took so long
For urban man to learn the mysteries of modem
Charity.Persuade the workers and the plants to give
Unanimously and scientifically.Stopwatch the man
Who solicits! IBM will tell us all we need to know.

As ANY FUND-RAISER worthy of his calling is fully aware, the United Foundation of the metropolitan Detroit area was, in the years following 1949, the number-one federated solicitation organization in the voluntary welfare field.Much word-of-mouth publicity was gained by this group as it conquered almost every obstacle in its drive to consolidate agency fund-raising in the automobile capital of the world. The "Give Once" drives in Philadelphia and the San Francisco Bay Area (the United Crusade), the next largest, could not match its totals.When the United Foundation was being founded in 1948, the separate campaigns carried on in Detroit raised $7,200,000. The first of the Torch Drives raised the figure to $9,247,045 in 1949. Corporations contributed an initial 40.4 per cent of the total as the United Foundation got off to a flying start.Never would it exceed or even match that percentage again.

Rising by roughly one million dollars a year in the days of general prosperity, the Detroit united fund raised, in 1955, the sum of $15,933,000. Thereafter, the total leveled off somewhat

-160-

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