Advances in Computer Vision - Vol. 1

By Christopher Brown | Go to book overview

standing Architecture, we are actively exploring computational architectures suited to the types of processing inherent in image understanding, explicitly taking into account the set of algorithms presented in this chapter and the bandwidth requirements of the communication channels between the different levels. When a physical slice of the architecture is constructed it will be used to run real-time vision interpretation experiments.


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

The authors wish to thank the members of the VISIONS research group, both past and present, for their contributions to a long-term dream. Since the beginning, there have been moments where particular individuals have provided significant leadership in the maturation of the ideas.

We wish to specifically acknowledge several individuals who have made major contributions to our 12-year effort. Tom Williams was there at the inception of the VISIONS project and contributed greatly to the design of the system through the first 6 years. Ralf Kohler designed the VISION software development environment that has supported empirical development in a flexible manner for many years. Joey Griffith has had his fingers in almost every aspect of the project for the last 6 years. George Reynolds has taken on a significant leadership role in the development of many aspects of intermediate processing. We also wish to acknowledge the leadership provided by Daryl Lawton and P. Anandan in developing our motion group.

In addition, a number of other people have made their presence felt including Terry Weymouth, John Lowrance, Frank Glazer, Paul Nagin, Bryant York, Gilad Adiv, Charlie Kohl, Len Wesley, Cesare Parma, and current members Bruce Draper, Rob Belknap, Bob Collins, Michael Boldt, Brian Burns, Ross Beveridge, Nancy Lehrer, Seraj Bharwani, Val Cohen, Jim Burrill, Bob Heller, Mark Snyder, Igor Pavlin, Rich Weiss, Les Kitchen, Chip Weems, and Steve Levitan.

We also wish to thank Janet Turnbull for her continuing support over the years, and Laurie Waskiewicz for her perserverance and good humor during the production of this chapter.

This work has been supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research under grant F49620-83-C-0099, by the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency under contracts N00014-82-K-0464 and DACA76-85-C-0008, and by the National Science Foundation under grant DCR-8318776.

-106-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Advances in Computer Vision - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Contributors vii
  • Introduction ix
  • References xiv
  • 1: The Visions Image-Understanding System 1
  • Introduction 2
  • Conclusion 105
  • Acknowledgements 106
  • References 107
  • 2: Robust Computation of Intrinsic Images from Multiple Cues 115
  • References 161
  • 3: Image Flow Theory: A Framework for 3-D Inference from Time-Varying Imagery 165
  • 3: Image Flow Theory 218
  • Acknowledgments 220
  • Author Index 225
  • Subject Index 229
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 236

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.