Conservatives in an Age of Change: The Nixon and Ford Administrations

By James Reichley | Go to book overview

11
The Second Term: Confronting the Bureaucracy

NIXON approached his second term with a tightfisted and caustic public attitude sharply different from the conciliatory temper he had displayed when he entered the presidency in 1969. "This country has enough on its plate in the way of huge spending programs, social programs, throwing dollars at problems," he told Garnett Horner in an interview a few days after the 1972 election. 1 Gone was the spirit of "Bring Us Together," the theme of Nixon's first inaugural. In its place appeared the assertive truculence of "the New Majority," which Nixon believed was fed up with social change.

The president's altered mood apparently sprang in part from the massive proportions of his 1972 victory. Nixon's popular majority-- 60.7 percent--was exceeded in modern history only by those awarded to Lyndon Johnson in 1964 and Franklin Roosevelt in 1936. In the electoral college, only the votes of Massachusetts and the District of Columbia deprived him of a unanimous verdict. Among groups giving majority support to Nixon were Catholics, manual workers, trade union members, southerners, and voters under thirty. Of the major elements that had made up the New Deal coalition, only Jews and blacks remained loyal to the Democratic candidate. Lack of confidence in George McGovern clearly contributed to the size of Nixon's victory. But the president believed, probably correctly, that the vote represented at least general approval by a large majority of Americans of his administration's performance during the first term and of the more conservative direction in which he had promised to lead the country if reelected.

-232-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conservatives in an Age of Change: The Nixon and Ford Administrations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 482

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.