Conservatives in an Age of Change: The Nixon and Ford Administrations

By James Reichley | Go to book overview

17
Energy Policy: The Fight for Decontrol

AMONG THE CHALLENGES with which Nixon and Ford administrations had to deal, none was more vexing, or potentially more momentous, than the shortage of energy resources that became critical in the fall of 1973.

The energy shortage was not entirely unanticipated. Everyone knew that supplies of oil and natural gas, upon which both industry and private households had become increasingly dependent, were not inexhaustible. Informed persons in government and industry had noted that oil production within the United States had peaked at 3.5 billion barrels in 1970, and then begun to fall. The share of American oil consumption supplied by imports had risen from 22 percent in 1968 to 29 percent in 1972. 1 Proven domestic reserves of natural gas reached their high point in 1967, and then slid into decline. 2 As early as 1965, James Schlesinger told his friend Charls Walker that the nation would soon be facing an energy crisis. 3

Yet for most Americans, the day of reckoning, if there was to be one, seemed far in the future. Oil prices increased only 10 percent from 1960 to 1970--less than the rate of inflation. Natural gas prices actually fell, chiefly because of federal regulation of the price of gas sold in interstate commerce. 4 For more than fifty years, proven reserves of oil and natural gas had usually seemed to be in danger of running down--but were always replenished by new discoveries in time to keep ahead of rising demand. Long before supplies of oil and gas were finally exhausted, the public had been led to believe, nuclear power would be harnessed to meet most energy requirements. Even

-358-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Conservatives in an Age of Change: The Nixon and Ford Administrations
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 482

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Sign up now to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    For full access in an ad-free environment, sign up now for a FREE, 1-day trial.

    Already a member? Log in now.