Joyce, Joyceans, and the Rhetoric of Citation

By Eloise Knowlton | Go to book overview

Foreword

Knowlton's book deals with textual authority, and especially the rhetoric of quotation in all its forms. The issues treated include such aspects as the nature of written versus oral signification, problems of authorship, fluidity of meaning, feminism, historiography, definitions of modernity, and the way Joyce provides a transition between modernity and postmodernism. No one with a formalist rhetorical perspective on the overarching issues has treated them so extensively in relation to modernism and how it applies to Joyce criticism.

The work is approximately two-thirds theoretical. It deals with the nature of history and its inscription in literature, with particular attention to the actual as reflected in quotations that date and record specific moments of history as quoted from people then living, to be read by readers from another vantage point on the historical continuum. Thus the modernist writer, like Joyce, draws upon the seeming verisimilitude of history, which is interpreted not only by a modern writer to be incorporated into his text with all of its anxiety-of-influence and artistic concerns, but also by contemporary readers with their own mental sets and ambitions.

The study is critically informed by such varied writers as Plato, Kant, Leavis, Foucault, Barthes, Derrida, Irigaray, Bloom, Benstock, and Kenner, presenting the multiple problems every thinking reader encounters in trying to make coherent patterns of the text; and it does so with an ease and seamless understanding of what genuinely matters presented in a language that is clear and precise. Thus quotation becomes metaphorized in its attempts at capturing an actuality both inside and outside a historical context. Besides the insights of the thesis itself, the book provides some remarkable new readings of Joyce's texts involving women.

Zack Bowen
Series Editor

-ix-

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Joyce, Joyceans, and the Rhetoric of Citation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments x
  • 1 - Punctum: An Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - Quotational Foundations 13
  • 2 - Modernity Draws the Line 15
  • 3 - Joyce's Citational Odyssey 35
  • Part 2 - Inside the Marks: Implications 49
  • 4 - Self . . . Style. Joyce . . . Author 51
  • 5 - Modern Citation, Modern Historiography 64
  • Part 3 - Beyond Quotation: Resistances 79
  • 6 - Moomb 81
  • 7 - Joyce and the Joyceans 101
  • Notes 115
  • Bibliography 125
  • Index 133
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