Joyce, Joyceans, and the Rhetoric of Citation

By Eloise Knowlton | Go to book overview

7
Joyce and the Joyceans

Take a book, and you will find it offering, opening itself. It is this openness of the book which I find so moving. A book is not shut in by its contours, is not walled-up as a fortress. It asks nothing better than to exist outside itself, or to let you exist in it. In short, the extraordinary fact in the case of a book is the falling away of the barriers between you and it.

Georges Poulet, "Criticism and Interiority"

So far, this book has been concerned with writing and speaking. It has described the way in which quotation, a written form, attempts to capture and preserve the authentic spoken word. It has traced a masculine quotational structure of separation, contestation, and property enacted through a concern for style and the author. It has sketched a quotational necessity in modernity's confrontation with the past, and an oral, feminine resistance to quotation's power. So far, modern citation has had most to do with what might be called expressive modes: writing, speaking, and the ways in which quotation constructs certain versions of them. However, quotation does not exist purely as an expressive, writerly set of ideas. As the previous chapter has found in Bloom's encounter with Sweets of Sin, quotation holds in its heart a deep anxiety about reception: about reading. Quotation has impressed our notion of reading with a dominant modern writerliness. One reads in control, to control. Reading is a struggle readers must win.

Reading is the central problem for quotation. As a system of fragmentation and possession, violence and control, the modern citational process is primarily thought of as a writerly one: what writers must do (to readings) to establish their places in discourse. (There is an urgent, identificatory necessity in this "must.") In this dynamic, the status of the read, and the fact that the author must, in some way and to some degree, give himself over to

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Joyce, Joyceans, and the Rhetoric of Citation
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents vii
  • Foreword ix
  • Acknowledgments x
  • 1 - Punctum: An Introduction 1
  • Part 1 - Quotational Foundations 13
  • 2 - Modernity Draws the Line 15
  • 3 - Joyce's Citational Odyssey 35
  • Part 2 - Inside the Marks: Implications 49
  • 4 - Self . . . Style. Joyce . . . Author 51
  • 5 - Modern Citation, Modern Historiography 64
  • Part 3 - Beyond Quotation: Resistances 79
  • 6 - Moomb 81
  • 7 - Joyce and the Joyceans 101
  • Notes 115
  • Bibliography 125
  • Index 133
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