BOOK IV

IN the following summer, about the time when the corn and comes into ear, ten Syracusan and ten Locrian ships took possession of Messenè in Sicily, whither they had gone by the invitation of the inhabitants. And so Messenè revolted from the Athenians. The Syracusans took part in this affair chiefly because they saw that Messenè was the key to Sicily. They were afraid that the Athenians would one day establish themselves there and come and attack them with a larger force. The Locrians took part because the Rhegians were their enemies, and they wanted to crush them by sea as well as by land. They had already invaded the territory of Rhegium with their whole army, in order to hinder the Rhegians from assisting the Messenians; they were also partly instigated by certain Rhegian exiles who had taken refuge with them. For the Rhegians had been for a long time torn by revolution, and in their present condition could not resist the Locrians, who for this very reason were the more disposed to attack them. After wasting the country, the Locrians withdrew their land forces; but the ships remained to protect Messenè. Another fleet which the allies were manning was intended to lie. in the harbour of Messenè, and to carry on the war from thence.

1

B.C. 425. Ol. 88, 4. The Syracusans and Locrians induce Messenè to revolt from the Althenians. The Locrians at the same time invade the territory of Rhegium.

During the spring and about the same time, before the of corn was in full ear, the Peloponnesians and their allies invaded Attica, under the command of Agis the son of Archidamus, the

2

Fifth invasion of Attica

-2-

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Thucydides - Vol. 2
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents of Vol. II v
  • Books Iv-Viii 1
  • Book IV 2
  • Book V 102
  • Book VI 178
  • Book VII 262
  • Book VIII 335
  • Index 421
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