Catholic Cults and Devotions: A Psychological Inquiry

By Michael P. Carroll | Go to book overview

Notes

CHAPTER ONE
I
This chapter is an expanded and revised version of an article that originally appeared in the Journal for the Scientific Study of Religion; see Carroll 1987c.
2
By "most poular" Taves means those twenty-three prayer books that were issued and re-issued most often during this period. She found that twenty-two of these twenty-three books mentioned the Rosary. By contrast, the devotions mentioned next most often were the benediction of the Blessed Sacrament, which was mentioned in fifteen of these twenty-three books, and devotion to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, mentioned in thirteen books.
3
For an account of these Rosary sessions in Catholic schools, written with gentle humour, see Cascone 1982, 106-15. A similarly humorous account, dealing with the recital of the Rosary during Mass, is given in Mearaet al. ( 1986, 100-I).
4
The second most common Rosary, for instance, is the Bridgettine Rosary. This is similar to the Dominican Rosary, except that it has six decades (rather than five) as well as a group of three Hail Mary beads. The sixty-three Hail Marys associated with this Rosary correspond to the sixty-three years that the Virgin Mary is supposed to have lived on earth. While the historical St Bridget did popularize the idea that the Virgin Mary died at age sixty-three, the Bridgettine Rosary came into use only long after St Bridget's death in 1373 (see Thurston I902c). Other rosaries which involve groupings of Our Fathers and Hail Marys that differ from the groupings associated with the Dominican Rosary are the Rosary of Our Lady of Consolation, the Rosary of the Immaculate Conception, the Rosary of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, and the Seraphic Rosary. Each of these variants is described in Attwater ( 1956, 255-6); see also Shaw ( 1954, 69-79).
5
Most readers familiar with the Rosary will know that a small tassel is usually attached to the circle of beads I have described. This tassel consists of a crucifix (on which is usually prayed the Apostles' Creed), an Our Father bead,

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