Reference Guide to Russian Literature

By Neil Cornwell; Nicole Christian | Go to book overview

N

Vladimir Vladimirovich Nabokov 1899-1977
Prose writer, translator, and lepidopterist

Biography

Born in St Petersburg, 22 April 1899. Attended Tenishev school, St Petersburg; fluent English and French speaker. Wrote under the pseudonym Vladimir Sirin until 1940. Published two collections of poetry, 1916 and 1918. Family emigrated in 1919; studied Romance and Slavonic Languages at Cambridge University, England.Moved to Berlin; worked as translator and writer, 1922-37. Father assassinated by monarchist extremists, 1922. Married: Vera Evseevna Slonim in 1924; one son. Moved to Paris, 1937; worked as translator, language teacher, and tennis instructor. As Europe fell to the Nazis, sailed to the United States, 1940. Thereafter wrote in English and translated important works of Russian literature. Taught at Wellesley College; also held a Harvard Research Fellowship in lepidoptera. Professor of Russian Literature, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, 1948-59. Retired after the success of Lolita; moved to Montreux, Switzerland, 1960, where he continued to write and set about finalising his literary affairs. Died in Lausanne, 2 July 1977. Began to be published in Russia only in 1986.


Publications

Collected Editions

Nine Stories. Norfolk, Connecticut, New Directions, 1947.

Nabokov's Dozen: A Collection of Thirteen Stories. New York, Doubleday, 1958; London, Heinemann, 1959; Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1960.

Nabokov's Quartet, translated by Dmitri Nabokov. New York, Phaedra, 1966; London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1967.

Poems and Problems (bilingual edition). New York, McGraw‐ Hill, 1970; London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1972.

A Russian Beauty and Other Stories, translated by Dmitri Nabokov and Simon Karlinsky. New York, McGraw-Hill, and London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1973; Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1975.

Tyrants Destroyed and Other Stories, translated by Dmitri Nabokov . New York, McGraw-Hill, and London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1975; Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1981.

Details of a Sunset and Other Stories, translated by Dmitri Nabokov with the author. New York, McGraw-Hill, 1976.

Five Novels. London, Collins, 1979.

The Man from the USSR and Other Plays, translated by Dmitri Nabokov . New York, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich, 1984; London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1985.

Sobranie sochinenii, 10 vols. Ann Arbor, Ardis, 1987 — [vols I, 3, 6, 9, 10 published].

Rasskazy. Moscow, 1989.

Istreblenie tiranov: Izbrannaia proza [ Tyrants Destroyed]. Minsk, 1989.

Krug [ Circle]. Leningrad, 1990.

P'esy [ Plays]. Moscow, 1990.

Sobranie sochinenii, edited by Viktor Erofeev, 4 vols. Moscow, 1990; supplementary volumes, 1992, 1995.

The Stories of Vladimir Nabokov. New York, Knopf, 1995; London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1996; as The Collected Stories of Vladimir Nabokov, Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1997.


Fiction

Mashen'ka. Berlin, 1926; reprinted Ann Arbor, Ardis, 1974; translated as Mary, by Michael Glenny with the author, New York, McGraw-Hill, 1970; London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1971; Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1973.

Korol', dama, valet. Berlin, 1928; reprinted Ann Arbor, Ardis, 1979; translated as King, Queen, Knave, by Dmitri Nabokov with the author, New York, McGraw-Hill, and London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1968.

Zashchita Luzhina. Berlin, 1930; reprinted Ann Arbor, Ardis, 1979; translated as The Defence, by Michael Scammell with the author, New York, Putnam, and London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1964; Oxford, Oxford University Press, 1986; as The Luzhin Defense, Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1994.

Vozvrashchenie Chorba. Berlin, 1930; reprinted Ann Arbor, Ardis, 1976; title story translated as "The Return of Chorb", by Dmitri Nabokov, in Details of a Sunset and Other Stories, 1976.

"Sogliadatai", Sovremennye zapiski, 44 ( 1930). Sogliadatai [as collection] 1938; reprinted Ann Arbor, Ardis, 1978; translated as The Eye, by Dmitri Nabokov with the author, London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1966; Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1992.

Kamera obskura. Paris, 1932; reprinted Ann Arbor, Ardis, 1978; translated as Camera Obscura, by Winifred Roy, London, John Long, 1936; also as Laughter in the Dark, by the author, New York, 1938; revised edition New York, New Directions, 1960; London, Weidenfeld and Nicolson, 1961; Harmondsworth, Penguin, 1963.

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Reference Guide to Russian Literature
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Reference Guide to Russian Literature *
  • Contents *
  • Editor's Note vii
  • Advisers xi
  • Contributors xi
  • Alphabetical List of Writers and Works xiii
  • Alphabetical List of Works xix
  • Chronological List of Writers xxiii
  • General Reading List xxvii
  • Chronology xxxv
  • Glossary xxxix
  • Introductory Essays *
  • Old Russian Literature 3
  • Pre-Revolutionary Russian Theatre 9
  • Russian Literature in the I8th Century 13
  • Aleksandr Pushkin: from Byron to Shakespeare 18
  • The Classic Russian Novel 25
  • The Superfluous Man in Russian Literature 29
  • Women's Writing in Russia 35
  • Russian Literary Theory: from the Formalists to Lotman 40
  • Post-Revolutionary Russian Theatre 45
  • Experiment and Emigration: Russian Literature, 1917-1953 49
  • Socialist Realism in Soviet Literature 55
  • Thaws, Freezes, and Wakes: Russian Literature, 1953-1991 59
  • Russian Literature in the Post-Soviet Period 64
  • Writers and Works *
  • A 73
  • B 127
  • C 213
  • D 237
  • E 271
  • F 297
  • G 311
  • H 379
  • I 389
  • K 413
  • L 485
  • M 521
  • N 559
  • O 585
  • P 611
  • R 685
  • S 707
  • T 789
  • U 859
  • V 861
  • Y 897
  • Z 899
  • Title Index 933
  • Notes on Advisers and Contributors 963
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