The O. J. Simpson Trials: Rhetoric, Media, and the Law

By Janice Schuetz; Lin S. Lilley | Go to book overview

Contributors
Ann Burnett is an associate professor of communication at North Dakota State University. She received her doctorate from the University of Utah in 1986, where her research focused on jury decision making. She has published numerous articles on juror behavior. Burnett completed her first year of law school at the University of Nebraska.
Diane Furno-Lamude is an associate professor in the Department of Communication and Journalism at the University of New Mexico, where she teaches and conducts research on audience behavior and the social consequences of mass media. She has published numerous articles on the use of mass media in the United States and the social effects of television. She received her doctorate from the University of Utah.
Patricia M. Ganer is a professor of speech communication at Cypress College. A former president of the American Forensic Association, she has published and presented papers to the Speech Communication Association, Western Speech Communication Association, and International Communication Association in areas of legal communication, political communication, and argumentation. She received her doctorate from the University of Utah.
Ann M. Gill is a professor and the chair of the Department of Speech Communication at Colorado State University. Gill holds a Ph.D. from the University of Denver and a J.D. from the University of Colorado. She has served as president of the national Cross-Examination Debate Association and is the author of two books and a number of articles and book chapters, many concerning freedom of speech and legal discourse.
Lin S. Lilley is the president of Southwest Trial Consulting, Inc., based in Austin, Texas, and has been a trial consultant for the past twenty years. During that time, Lilley has assisted attorneys in selecting over five hundred juries and has lectured extensively to legal groups about voir dire

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