Understanding Stone Tools and Archaeological Sites

By Brian P. Kooyman | Go to book overview

Aknowledgments

An early draft of this book was used as a textbook for my Prehistoric Stone Technology class in 1997. The students in that class provided me with many comments on the merits and weak areas of that manuscript and their input has allowed me to enhance it considerably. Rejane Boudreau was particularly helpful in this regard. I appreciated Don Hanna's willingness to assist with, and appear in, Figures 15, 16, 17, 19, and 20. Most of the photographs in the book were taken by Gerry Newlands (Figures 1-5, 11, 14-21, 37, 38, 40-42, 45-47, 49-79, 94,95). His high standards and skill in highlighting the best in the specimens has made a significant contribution to the clarity and usefulness of the book (I am responsible for the other photographs). I was very fortunate to have Lu-Anne Da Costa as an illustrator. Her artistic talents, patience, and knowledge of lithic technology have made my crude initial sketches and comments come through better than I had imagined possible. Many colleagues have discussed lithic analysis with me over the years and I wish to thank them for the shared insights. Barney Reeves, Don Crabtree, and Marty Magne were particularly influential in sparking my enthusiasm at key times. A number of reviewers have commented on the text. Their suggestions have made me think about what I have said and justify my assertions. I have incorporated many of their ideas and these have greatly improved the book. I cannot overemphasize how much I have benefited from the encouragement, careful editing, and excellent layout assistance of the staff of the University of Calgary Press. Perhaps only those who have been involved in such a process can understand what a transformation this has wrought. Scott Raymond, my Department Head in Archaeology during the writing of the book, supported my efforts throughout and let me cut a few corners in other areas when I really needed the time. My family, Susan and Patrick, have been understanding when I had deadlines to meet and have given me the positive atmosphere I needed to keep on going. I hope that all of these individuals can see their hands in the work and know that I sincerely appreciate their efforts and support. Responsibility for the opinions and interpretations, of course, rests with the author.

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