Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President

By Allen C. Guelzo | Go to book overview

Epilogue: The Redeemer President

Lincoln's death struck the nation with almost physical force. "You can scarcely imagine the feeling that pervades Washington," wrote one army clerk on Sunday. "The sorrow & Mourning are indescribable. It is not considered a shame or weakness to weep over the foul & horrid crime. Nor is it rare to see eyes streaming with tears. I cried like a child myself today...." A Massachusetts soldier in the Washington garrison wrote home, "We all felt as though we had our father murdered"; Garth Wilkinson James, an officer in the black 54th Massachusetts (and brother of Harvard philosopher William James), wrote that his regiment had "been talking him over and over ever since we heard of his death, and such a crowd of heart-broken young men you would never see again." In city after city, the streamers and bunting that had celebrated Lee's surrender were haltingly pulled in and replaced by abject festoons of black crepe, and flags sank ashamed to half-mast. On Wall Street, "the excitement . . . was intense; so much so that business was stopped & many houses entirely closed.... By noon all of Broadway was draped in mourning." In Cincinnati, a mob gathered outside the hotel where Junius Brutus Booth was staying, howling for his blood, and it was several days before Booth was able to slip out of the city. Southern sympathizers and paroled Confederate soldiers were beaten

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Abraham Lincoln: Redeemer President
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Abraham Lincoln - Redeemer President *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction: the Strife of Ideas 3
  • 1: The American System 26
  • 2: The Costs of Union 64
  • 3: The Doctrine of Necessity 102
  • 4: The Fuel of Interest 143
  • 5: Moral Principle is All That Unites Us 185
  • 6: An Accidental President 228
  • 7: War in a Conciliatory Style 269
  • 8: Voice Out of the Whirlwind 311
  • 9: Whig Jupiter 352
  • 10: Malice Toward None 397
  • Epilogue: the Redeemer President 439
  • A Note on the Sources 465
  • Index 500
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