Candidates in Conflict: Persuasive Attack and Defense in the 1992 Presidential Debates

By William L. Benoit; William T. Wells | Go to book overview

7
Debate Two October 15, 1992.

MODERATOR: Tonight's program is unlike any other presidential debate in history--we're making history now, and it's pretty exciting. An independent polling firm has selected an audience of 209 uncommitted voters from this area. The candidates will be asked questions by these voters on a topic of their choosing--anything they want to ask about. My job as moderator is to, you know, take care of the questioning, ask questions myself if I think there needs to be continuity and balance, and sometimes I might ask the candidates to respond to what another candidate may have said.

Now, the format has been agreed to by representatives of both the Republican and Democratic campaigns. And there is no subject matter that is restricted--anything goes, we can ask anything.

After the debate, the candidates will have an opportunity to make a closing statement. So, President Bush, I think you said it earlier, let's get it on.

BUSH: Let's go.

MODERATOR: And I think the first question is over here.

QUESTION: Yes, I'd like to direct my question to Mr. Perot. What will you do as president to open foreign markets to fair competition from American business and to stop unfair competition here at home from foreign countries so that we can bring jobs back to the United States?

PEROT: That's right at the top of my agenda. We've shipped millions

-156-

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