Candidates in Conflict: Persuasive Attack and Defense in the 1992 Presidential Debates

By William L. Benoit; William T. Wells | Go to book overview

8
Debate Three October 19, 1992

MODERATOR: Gentlemen, again, welcome, and again, good evening. It seems, from what some of those voters said at your Richmond debate and from polling and other data, that each of you fairly or not faces serious voter concerns about the underlying credibility and believability of what each of you says you would do as president in the next four years. Governor Clinton, in accordance with the draw, those concerns about you are first. You are promising to create jobs, reduce the deficit, reform the health care system, rebuild the infrastructure, guarantee college education for everyone who is qualified, among many other things, all with financial pain only for the very rich. Some people are having trouble, apparently, believing that is possible. Should they have that concern?

CLINTON: No. There are many people who believe that the only way we can get this country turned around is to tax the middle class more and punish them more. But the truth is that middle-class Americans are basically the only group of Americans who have been taxed more in the 1980s and during the last twelve years even though their incomes have gone down. The wealthiest Americans have been taxed much less even though their incomes have gone up. Middle-class people will have their fair share of changing to do and many challenges to face, including the challenge of becoming constantly reeducated. But my plan is a departure from trickle-down economics, just cutting taxes on the wealthiest Americans and getting out of the way.

-193-

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