Diabetes, Beating the Odds: The Doctor's Guide to Reducing Your Risk

By Elliot J. Rayfield; Cheryl Solimini et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER
7
Defensive De-stressing

STRESS is a fact of life. Unless you're a hermit, outside events will have a way of niggling into your conscious or unconscious mind, creating anxiety, nervousness, fear— all the risks of being engaged in the real world. If you have a family, a job, any responsibilities at all, you will feel the strain at certain times. Not all of the stress is negative: starting a new job, planning a wedding, buying a home, or having a baby is a situation that may call upon your coping skills, even though the results are personally satisfying.

Sometimes the source of your stress may not be obvious— an event or emotion long buried may provoke an anxiety attack in a current instance that, on the surface, may not seem threatening. At other times, you may not notice what is producing your reaction—perhaps because you yourself create the tension and avoid paying attention to this fact.

Whether or not you are aware of the stress's source, you register its symptoms. You may feel muscle tightness in your neck, shoulders, or back. You may find yourself clenching your jaw, grinding your teeth, or stammering. You may suffer headaches more often than usual. You may have trouble sleeping—or getting out of bed. You may experience depression, anger, fatigue, confusion, loneliness,

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