Chesapeake Politics, 1781-1800

By Norman K. Risjord | Go to book overview
Contents
Part One The Chesapeake Landscape
CHAPTER ONE The Landscape and the People, from the Susquehanna to the Rappahannock3
CHAPTER TWO The Landscape and the People, from the Rappahannock to Cape Fear38
Part Two The Beginnings of Political Parties, 1781-1787
CHAPTER THREE The Politics of Personalities, 1781-178371
CHAPTER FOUR Debtor Relief for Rich and Poor96
CHAPTER FIVE Emergence of State Parties, 1784-1787122
CHAPTER SIX Depression Politics, 1784-1787160
CHAPTER SEVEN Tories, Anglicans, and Slaves192
CHAPTER EIGHT The Western Question219
Part Three The Constitution and National Parties, 1788-1792
CHAPTER NINE The Movement for Federal Reform251
CHAPTER TEN Ratification with or without Amendments276
CHAPTER ELEVEN Federalists Triumphant320
CHAPTER TWELVE The Death of Antifederalism342
CHAPTER THIRTEEN The Chesapeake Wins the Capital363
CHAPTER FOURTEEN Rise of the Republicans394
Part Four The Party System Matures, 1793-1800
CHAPTER FIFTEEN The Politics of Neutrality, 1793-1794418
CHAPTER SIXTEEN The Politics of Taxes and Treaties, 1794-1795443
CHAPTER SEVENTEEN Prosperity Solves Many Problems468

-xiii-

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