Left Handed, Son of Old Man Hat: A Navajo Autobiography

By Left Handed; Walter Dyk | Go to book overview

3. Speculations on man and nature . . . He makes a trip to the Oraibi and a journey to Fort Defiance.

EARLY one morning while it was still dark it began to snow. When daybreak came it stopped. Soon it cleared up, and the sun came out and was shining. In a little while there was no snow left. The earth was drying, and there was steam on the ground all over. After it dried I walked around upon the hill, looking out over the valley to different places, and everything was getting green. It was so pretty after the snow; it made me so happy. That's the way I used to be, as soon as spring came, as soon as things got green, it always made me happy. When I came back inside the hogan I said, "Everything's beginning to get green. Soon we'll have lots to eat for our stocks."

At that time I didn't know anything about winter and summer, or spring and fall. All suddenly I would notice the heat or the cold. In the spring when it got warm and the brush and weeds and grasses that were dry got green I used to wonder why it all went dry and started getting green again. And I wondered why and where the snow fell from, and about the cold, and what sprinkled the rain on us. In the summer everything was green, but when summer was gone it all dried up, all the green stuff turned yellow and some turned white. I used to think, "Everything ought to be green all the time."

In the fall when it got cold, or around when the first snow fell, my mother would say, "It's a hard time for us. I hate to

-40-

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