American Art of Our Century

By Lloyd Goodrich; John I. H. Baur | Go to book overview

exhibitions, 1914-1960
The following is a list of exhibitions held at the Whitney Studio, the Whitney Studio Club, the Whitney Studio Galleries, and the Whitney Museum of America Art. All catalogues for the years 1914-30 are out of print. The one-man exhibitions At the Studio, the Club, and the Galleries were of paintings or sculpture, unless otherwise noted. They were often held for two, three, four, or five artists simultaneously, in separate galleries, and at the Whitney Studio Galleries generally with separate catalogues.
WHITNEY STUDIO
1914 Benefit Exhibition.
"50-50" Exhibition and Art Sale.
1915 Benefit Competition in Painting, Sculpture, and Architecture.
A. E. Gallatin Collection.
Warren Davis.
Friends of the Young Artists (three competitions: June, July, September).
The Immigrant in America Competition.
1916 Artists of Six Nations.
John Sloan.
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney.
"To Whom Shall I Go for My Portrait?"
1917 "To Whom Shall I Go for My Portrait?" (second and third exhibitions).
Friends of the Young Artists Competition.
Introspective Art: Claude Buck, Abraham Harriton, Benjamin D. Kopman, Jennings Tofel, who called themselves the Introspective Painters; and the following guests: Jacques r. Chesno, Robert Laurent, Van D. Perrine, Felix Russman.
Landscapes by Young American Painters.
1918 Indigenous Exhibition.
Chinese "Modernists."
Indigenous Sculpture.
Ernest Lawson; Guy Pène du Bois.
Allen Tucker.
1919 Randall Davey; Gifford Beal.
Malvina Hoffman; Arthur Crisp.
Florence Lucius; Grace Mott Johnson.
Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney.
1920 Russian Posters.
1921 Overseas Exhibition (an exhibition of American paintings organized and financed by Mrs. Whitney; sent to the International Art Exhibition, Venice, 1920; to London, Sheffield, and Paris, 1921; exhibited at the Whitney Studio on its return).
1923 recent Paintings by Pablo Picasso and Negro Sculpture, arranged by Marius de Zayas.
1924 Group exhibition: Charles Demuth, Walt Kuhn, Henry Schnakenberg, Charles Sheeler, Eugene Speicher, Allen Tucker, Nan Watson.
French and American Lithographs and Etchings, arranged by Marius de Zayas.
Henri Rousseau; Aristide Maillol.
Charles Sheeler (paintings and photographs).
1925 Cecil Howard.
Greek Art.
Self-Portraits by Contemporary Artists.
1926 Florence Lucius; Jeanne Poupelet (drawings).
John Duncan Ferguson.
1927 Paintings by Children of the King-Coit School.

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American Art of Our Century
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Part One - 1900-1939 7
  • 1 - American Art in 1900 9
  • 2 - The Whitney Museum of American Art 12
  • 3 - The Eight and Other City Realists 20
  • 4 - Primitives 29
  • 5 - Pioneers of Modernism: Post-Impressionism and Expressionism 32
  • 6 - Pioneers of Modernism: Abstraction 42
  • 7 - Precisionists 50
  • 8 - Sculpture, 1910-1939 58
  • 9 - Representational Painting 67
  • 10 - The American Scene 84
  • 11 - The Social School 98
  • 12 - Fantasy 104
  • 13 - The Trend toward Abstraction 109
  • Part Two - 1940-1960 119
  • 14 - Romantic Realism 121
  • 15 - Traditional Sculpture 133
  • 16 - Precise Realism 138
  • 17 - Fantasy and Surrealism 148
  • 18 - Social Comment 157
  • 19 - Expressionism: Painting 169
  • 20 - Expressionism: Sculpture 190
  • 21 - Semi-Abstraction 197
  • 22 - Free-Form Abstraction: Painting 208
  • 23 - Free-Form Abstraction: Sculpture 230
  • 24 - Formal Abstraction: Painting 239
  • 25 - Formal Abstraction: Sculpture 252
  • Whitney Museum of American Art 265
  • Whitney Museum of American Art 266
  • Catalogue of the Collection 267
  • Index by Mediums 298
  • Exhibitions, 1914-1960 301
  • Books Published by the Whitney Museum of American Art 306
  • Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art, 1956-1960 307
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