History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the Mckinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 8

By James Ford Rhodes | Go to book overview

CHAPTER VI

The President-elect between election and the inauguration has much to do and among his various occupations he must give his chief attention to the forming of his Cabinet. The voice of the country with no uncertain sound demanded the continuance of Sherman in the Treasury department; next to Garfield he had the largest support from business and intelligent men. A partisan he could always be counted upon for party service and once, when unjustifiably suspected of this he gave in a brief speech at his Mansfield ( Ohio) home a contribution to our political parlance that has many times served journalists when they desired to twit some seeker of political support who cloaked his real design. "I came west," he said, "purely on private business—to repair my fences."1 While a party man he was nevertheless a wise patriot, earned fully the popular designation of statesman, and commended himself without the least calculation on his part to the independent voters whose voice was heard in The Nation: "If Mr. Garfield retains Sherman as Secretary of the Treasury it will be understood that he has not surrendered to the Bosses. If Mr. Sherman is not retained the sign will be equally clear that the Machine has overmastered him."2 Sherman would have been glad to continue in his position but before The Nation

____________________
1
J. Sherman, Rec., ii. 728.
2
Dec. 2, 1880.

-139-

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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the Mckinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 8
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • Contents vii
  • History of the United States from Hayes to Mckinley 1
  • Chapter II 52
  • Chapter III 88
  • Chapter IV 109
  • Chapter V 128
  • Chapter VI 139
  • Chapter VII 161
  • Chapter VIII 180
  • Chapter IX 197
  • Chapter X 215
  • Chapter XI 240
  • Chapter XII 255
  • Chapter XIII 305
  • Chapter XIV 328
  • Chapter XV 341
  • Chapter XVI 365
  • Chapter XVII 380
  • Chapter XVIII 394
  • Chapter XIX 418
  • Chapter XX 443
  • Index 463
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