7
Terrorism Today and Tomorrow

Terrorism today is dominated by several different trends that in recent years have become increasingly intertwined -- with often unsettling consequences. The re-emergence in the early 1980s of terrorism motivated by a religious imperative and state-sponsored terrorism set in motion profound changes in the nature, motivations and capabilities of terrorists that are still unfolding. The appearance later in the decade of a professional subculture of terrorist 'guns for hire', coupled with the proliferation during the 1990s of so-called 'amateur' terrorists (with little or no formal connection to an existing terrorist group), continued this process, transforming terrorism into the arguably more diffuse and amorphous phenomenon that it has now become. This concluding chapter discusses some of the implications of these trends within the context of the rise and persistence of state- sponsored terrorism and for the light that they shed on potential terrorist use of weapons of mass destruction.


The Emergence of Modern State-sponsored Terrorism

Certainly, governments have long engaged in various types of illicit, clandestine activities -- including the systematic use of terror -- against their enemies, both domestic and foreign. The Nazis' victimization of Jews, gypsies, communists and homosexuals, political rivals and other 'enemies of the state' in Germany, and the Serbian military's intimate involvement in fomenting anti-Habsburg unrest in Bosnia on the eve of

-185-

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Inside Terrorism
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page 3
  • Contents 5
  • Preface 7
  • Abbreviations 11
  • 1 - Defining Terrorism 13
  • 2 - The Post-Colonial Era: Ethno-Nationalist/Separatist Terrorism 45
  • Conclusion 64
  • 3 - The Internationalization of Terrorism 67
  • Conclusion 84
  • 4 - Religion and Terrorism 87
  • Conclusion 127
  • 5 - Terrorism, the Media and Public Opinion 131
  • Conclusion 154
  • 6 - The Modern Terrorist Mindset: Tactics,Targets and Technologies 157
  • Conclusion 183
  • 7 - Terrorism Today and Tomorrow 185
  • Bibliography 248
  • Index 279
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