Culture and Critique: An Introduction to the Critical Discourses of Cultural Studies

By Jere Paul Surber | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

This work is a genuinely collective project, involving not only my own study and thought but that of the many students and colleagues in dialogue with whom I learned what now appears between its covers. I thank them one and all for their patience, generosity, and support. Most of all, however, I am grateful for their continually "holding my feet to the fire," for reminding me that the enterprise of cultural critique must remain constantly in touch with the joys, sufferings, and hopes of real human beings who are trying to navigate their diverse ways through the labyrinth of everyday life in the contemporary world--and for never letting me forget that it can still be changed for the better. If I did not learn your lessons well enough, be assured that I'm still trying.

Several notes of special thanks are also in order. My colleagues in the department of philosophy at the University of Denver have, over many years, provided a warm home for me--someone who in most places would have been regarded as an intellectual transient or worse. Professor M. E. Warlick of the department of art and art history has been one of the fixed stars in my intellectual firmament for these many years, and I thank her for sharing in so many of my academic and intellectual adventures at the "margins of the modern mind." If Sophia has a face, it is hers. I should also like to express my appreciation for the staff at Westview Press, especially my text editors, Melanie Stafford and Rebecca Ritke, whose thoughtful and perceptive suggestions have managed to remove much of the detritus of a Roman Catholic and later German education from my often Teutonic writing style.

Most of all, I want to thank my "partner" (in many more senses than I could enumerate), Karen C. Smith. She, more than anyone, provided the energy and support that allowed me to bring this project to a conclusion. And I have to thank my son Guy not only for the space to work but for keeping me at the cutting edges of popular culture as only an early teen can. He is certainly the most exacting and critical semiotician that I know.

Jere Surber Denver, Colorado

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Culture and Critique: An Introduction to the Critical Discourses of Cultural Studies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 294

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.