The Darwinian Heritage and Sociobiology

By Johan M. G. Van Der Dennen; David Smillie et al. | Go to book overview

5
Evolution and Culture: The Missing Link

Robin Allott

The relation of evolution and culture has been much debated. There have been many different approaches, of which the most notable have been those of Cavalli-Sforza and Feldman, Lumsden and Wilson, and Boyd and Richerson. Also noteworthy are the views of Durham and Hinde and most recently of the evolutionary psychologists. If these other accounts, or any one of them, seem to cover the subject adequately and to be intellectually satisfying, no new approach would be needed. The first step, then, is to summarize and assess the theories that have been presented.


THEORIES

Cavalli-Sforza and Feldman ( 1981) adopted a quantitative approach. After pointing out that up to that date cultural transmission had received little attention, they stressed the need for a theory of cultural change; they chose to develop a mathematical theory since the modern theory of biological evolution owed much of its strength to the mathematical background, primarily in population genetics. They sought to deal with the dynamics of the changes within a population of the relative frequencies of the forms of a cultural trait under defined cultural interactions, while recognizing that for humans it is difficult to partition the process of transmission into purely genetic and purely cultural components. Cultural traits vary in significance. There are relatively trivial ones (innovations such as the spread of Coca-Cola or volleyball) where participation in the trait cannot appreciably alter the probability of surviving or having children; in these instances some kind of non-Darwinian selection is involved that they termed

-67-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Darwinian Heritage and Sociobiology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 353

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.