The Darwinian Heritage and Sociobiology

By Johan M. G. Van Der Dennen; David Smillie et al. | Go to book overview

11
Ethnic Conflicts and Ethnic Nepotism

Tatu Vanhanen

Ethnic conflicts seem to be common in all ethnically plural societies and across all cultural boundaries, although such conflicts are not always termed "ethnic." Conflicting ethnic groups may be national, tribal, racial, religious, linguistic, cultural, or communal groups. Conflicts between castes and with indigenous people belong to the same category. Experience shows that political and economic interest conflicts become easily organized along ethnic lines in ethnically divided societies. In extreme cases, ethnic conflicts paralyze societies and culminate in violent confrontations and civil wars. Social scientists have sought theoretical explanations for ethnic conflicts. Why are ethnic conflicts so common? Why has it been so difficult for ethnic groups to live in harmony with each other and to agree on the sharing of scarce resources? Further, how are we to accommodate ethnic conflicts? Social scientists have not yet agreed on a satisfactory theoretical explanation for ethnic conflicts (see, for example, Ra bushka & Shepsle, 1972; Horowitz, 1985; Smith, 1987; Rupesinghe, 1988; Gurr, 1993; Gurr & Harff, 1994; McGarry & O'Leary, 1994; Glickman, 1995; Hutchinson & Smith, 1996). Many researchers argue that ethnic conflicts are cultural conflicts that need a separate explanation in each case. Consequently, there cannot be any general theoretical explanation for them. Other researchers have attempted to formulate more general explanations for ethnic conflicts. My intention is to derive a theoretical explanation for the persistence of ethnic conflicts from a sociobiological kin-selection theory and to test it by empirical evidence.

-187-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Darwinian Heritage and Sociobiology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 353

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.