Reading German: A Course and Reference Grammar

By Waltraud Coles; Bill Dodd | Go to book overview

1

TEXT 1A
1. Mehr als 100 Millionen Menschen sprechen Deutsch als More than 100 million people speak German as
2. Muttersprache. Aber nicht alle deutschsprechenden (their) mother tongue. But not all German-speaking
3. Leute wohnen in Deutschland. In ­sterreich, in einem people live in Germany. In Austria, in one
4. Teil der Schweiz und in Liechtenstein spricht man part of Switzerland and in Liechtenstein one speaks
5. auch Deutsch. Auβerdem findet man deutschsprachige also German. In addition one finds German-speaking
6. Bevölkerungsgruppen in vielen anderen Ländern. sections of the population in many other countries.

1.0
Reading the above text you will note a number of differences between the English and the German. The most obvious difference concerns spelling.
■ All German NOUNS are spelt with an initial capital letter. For example: Millionen, Menschen, Leute, Teil, Länder
■ German has letters which do not exist in English. For example in the above text: Österreich, auβerdem, Bevölkerungsgruppen, Ländern. There are four letters the English alphabet does not have:

ä Ä ö Ö ü Ü β

β (called ess-tsett) is similar to ss. It only exists in lower case. Straβe (street) can be written Strasse.

The two dots above the vowels a, o, u are called an UMLAUT. An umlaut changes the sound of the vowel. For reading purposes a vowel with an umlaut is a different letter from the vowel without an umlaut, e.g.:

Kuchencakezahlento payfallento fall
Küchenkitchenszählento countfällento fell

If a particular word cannot be found in the dictionary or if the meaning found does not fit the context, it may be because the umlaut has been overlooked.

Also allow for the effects of the spelling reform introduced in 1996. For further information on the spelling reform see R191.

The letter β is treated as ss in dictionaries. ä, ö, ü are listed with/after a, o, u, e.g. zählen immediately follows zahlen

-9-

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Reading German: A Course and Reference Grammar
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Authors' Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • About This Book x
  • Part I - Reading Course 1
  • List of Chapter Topics 3
  • 1 9
  • 2 14
  • 3 22
  • 4 30
  • 5 38
  • 6 44
  • 7 51
  • 8 58
  • 9 65
  • 10 73
  • 11 80
  • 12 89
  • 13 94
  • 14 98
  • 15 104
  • 16 110
  • Key to Coursebook Exercises 117
  • Part II - Reference Section 131
  • List of Topics 133
  • Key to Further Exercises 321
  • Part IV - German-English Text Corpus 335
  • List of Texts 336
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