Reading German: A Course and Reference Grammar

By Waltraud Coles; Bill Dodd | Go to book overview

13
A Social History of Work
The text in this chapter is taken from an essay by the sociologist Iring Fetscher.
A: Pre-reading exercises
This is a fairly long text and the pre-reading exercises have been expanded and broken down into more detailed suggestions, including focusing on parts of the text for closereading. You should not spend more than the suggested time on each exercise.
A1. Spend one minute thinking about what you understand by 'social history' and in particular what you might expect to find in an essay on the social history of work. What items of vocabulary belong to this field?
A2. Let your eye travel over the text for a few seconds without making any attempt to read it. Note how many paragraphs there are.

Note: The bold type and italics in this text have been added. They are not part of the original text.

A3. The logical connectors have been printed in bold type in the first two paragraphs and in the final paragraph. Take a few seconds to glance at these.
A4. Negation words have been printed in italics in the first paragraph and the final paragraph. Take a few seconds to glance at these.
A5. Take a minute or so to skim through the text looking briefly at the nouns.
A6. Now skim through the text again, taking a little longer, noticing any words and phrases which you think you recognize. Distinguish between those you are sure you know and those which you think you can guess.
A7. Although you have not been making a conscious effort to read the text so far, take a minute or two now to focus on what you have found out about the text, and in particular on what kind of information it contains.
A8. Now close-read the first sentence of each paragraph and try to use what you have learnt to make a prediction about what each paragraph is about. (Where the first sentence is very long, you can probably stop at a colon (:) or semi-colon (;) without disturbing the meaning.) Once you have worked through the whole text thoroughly, come back to the notes you have made and observe how accurately they predict the meaning of the text as a whole.

Now read the whole text.

-94-

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Reading German: A Course and Reference Grammar
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Authors' Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • About This Book x
  • Part I - Reading Course 1
  • List of Chapter Topics 3
  • 1 9
  • 2 14
  • 3 22
  • 4 30
  • 5 38
  • 6 44
  • 7 51
  • 8 58
  • 9 65
  • 10 73
  • 11 80
  • 12 89
  • 13 94
  • 14 98
  • 15 104
  • 16 110
  • Key to Coursebook Exercises 117
  • Part II - Reference Section 131
  • List of Topics 133
  • Key to Further Exercises 321
  • Part IV - German-English Text Corpus 335
  • List of Texts 336
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