Reading German: A Course and Reference Grammar

By Waltraud Coles; Bill Dodd | Go to book overview

16
German Emigration to America
This final chapter contains an extract from an article in an academic journal on the causes of German emigration to America in the nineteenth century. The German used here is as complex as you are likely to encounter. In fact, most texts you may want to read will probably be easier than this.
A: Pre-reading exercises
A1. Reading the title
1. What is the German for the United States?
2. If the verb 'to emigrate' is aus'wandern, what is the meaning of Massenauswanderung?
3. Similarly, what is the meaning of Wahrnehmung? (see glossary)
4. Does the article discuss the cause (singular) or the causes (plural) of emigration?
5. Can you now translate the title?
A2. There are several different expressions in this text with the meaning 'emigrate', 'emigration' or 'people who emigrate'. Without reading the text, quickly search the glossary and see how many of these terms you can find.
A3. Now that you have gained an idea of what the article is about, spend a few minutes thinking about what you know about this subject, and about what kind of information you might expect to find in the article. What are the key words in English? (For a suggested solution, see the key.)
A4. Skim the text for words which you recognize immediately, either because (a) they look like English words or because (b) you have met them before. But beware of 'false friends' (see R164).
A5. This text contains several numbers and dates. Skim-read the text, paying attention only to these numbers and dates, and to anything in the immediate context that you recognize. (This may help you to focus on what the article is basically about.)
A6. Skim the text for logical connectors (which are printed in bold).
1. Which of these connectors belong together in logical pairs?
2. Which introduce a contrast of some kind?
3. Which continue and extend the information which has just been provided in the text?

-110-

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Reading German: A Course and Reference Grammar
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Authors' Preface vii
  • Contents ix
  • About This Book x
  • Part I - Reading Course 1
  • List of Chapter Topics 3
  • 1 9
  • 2 14
  • 3 22
  • 4 30
  • 5 38
  • 6 44
  • 7 51
  • 8 58
  • 9 65
  • 10 73
  • 11 80
  • 12 89
  • 13 94
  • 14 98
  • 15 104
  • 16 110
  • Key to Coursebook Exercises 117
  • Part II - Reference Section 131
  • List of Topics 133
  • Key to Further Exercises 321
  • Part IV - German-English Text Corpus 335
  • List of Texts 336
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