Women's Paid and Unpaid Labor: The Work Transfer in Health Care and Retailing

By Nona Y. Glazer | Go to book overview

6
The Clerkless Customer: Doing Away with "Wasteful" Labor

Attended by saleswomen trained to service and servility, wealthy women in the 1880s and 1890s shopped in "grand palaces of consumption," lavish department stores in Buffalo and Boston, Chicago and Atlanta (Benson 1986). Even then, however, Chicagoans were doing selfservice, standing in lines for food at the new "cafeteria." Women of modest means who had visited across the counter with the clerks at Lutey Brothers' store in Butte, Montana, by 1912 were serving themselves next door, at Lutey's Marketeria, modeled on Chicago's cafeteria. In 1916, in Memphis, Tennessee, customers were doing self-service shopping at Piggly Wiggly, modeled on Lutey's Marketeria. And in 1918, Scientific American could describe the transformation of the wellserved shopper into the "clerkless customer."

Retailers were gradually transferring the work of salesclerks, delivery persons, and other staff to women shoppers, 1 expecting them to do "much of the time-consuming unorderly marketing burden" and reduce the "wasted [sic] time of employees waiting on each customer" ( Cassady 1962: 101).

The work transfer changed shopping for women, many of whom were simultaneously losing the services of hired hands, "helpers," and domestic servants. For them, self-service was innovative in degree, rather than kind, in the sense that preindustrial housework was rarely done by one woman in isolation. At the least, paid helpers, offspring (boys and girls), other relatives on extended visits, and even husbands participated in domestic chores. With the shift away from household production and toward the purchase of goods and services in the marketplace, women, even poor ones, were progressively isolated in their domestic activities. Self-service was one more step in the expansion of

-87-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women's Paid and Unpaid Labor: The Work Transfer in Health Care and Retailing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Part One - Changes in Women's Lives 1
  • 1 - From Paid to Unpaid Work 3
  • 2 - The Work Transfer in the Service Economy 15
  • 3 - Women's Work: Linking Separate Spheres 29
  • Part Two - The Retail Trade Industry 47
  • 4 - The Restructuring of Retailing 49
  • 5 - From Salesclerk to Cashier 68
  • 6 - The Clerkless Customer: Doing Away with "Wasteful" Labor 87
  • Part Three - The Health Services Industry 107
  • 7 - Capital and Labor: Restructuring Health Services 109
  • 8 - Changing Hospital Work 134
  • 9 - Changing Home Care 154
  • 10 - The Home as Workshop: Amateur Nursing -- Medical Caregivers 178
  • 11 - Conclusions 204
  • Appendix, Notes, References, and Index 221
  • Appendix 223
  • Notes 231
  • References 241
  • Index 269
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 273

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.