Women's Paid and Unpaid Labor: The Work Transfer in Health Care and Retailing

By Nona Y. Glazer | Go to book overview

11
Conclusions

I have tried to understand more fully the connections between changes in the domestic work of women as family members and changes in the daily work of women as service employees in two industries, retailing and health care. I call the connecting process the work transfer, by which employers selectively and even capriciously reorganize the labor process. They eliminate paid workers, but some work still needs doing. They reduce the number of paid workers, but some work still needs doing. They retain paid workers, but assign them new work, taking away some of their old work, but the work still needs doing. The doers are largely women. They assume (as others assume) that they must complete the work as an integral part of their domestic responsibilities -- not as an extra, not as new work. 1 I have tried to make explicit the power of major corporations and the state in a liberal capitalist society to reshape the workplace and family life and to do so by decommodifying wage labor and appropriating the nonwage labor of women family members to take its place. Women experience the consequences of the work transfer twice, first as wives, mothers, and adult daughters and daughters-in-law; and second as paid service workers.

Appropriation occurs deliberately when firms reorganize the labor process and deliberately transfer work to customers and clients. It occurs inadvertently when organizations, seeking to adjust to economic crises, change the labor process among service workers and reduce services to customers and clients. Men's nonwage labor also may be appropriated, but much less often than that of women, who are responsible for most of the work of social reproduction. The content of unpaid work is thus a result of changes in paid work. Unpaid workers must readjust their lives to accommodate the new work; paid workers must

-204-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Women's Paid and Unpaid Labor: The Work Transfer in Health Care and Retailing
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • List of Tables vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • Part One - Changes in Women's Lives 1
  • 1 - From Paid to Unpaid Work 3
  • 2 - The Work Transfer in the Service Economy 15
  • 3 - Women's Work: Linking Separate Spheres 29
  • Part Two - The Retail Trade Industry 47
  • 4 - The Restructuring of Retailing 49
  • 5 - From Salesclerk to Cashier 68
  • 6 - The Clerkless Customer: Doing Away with "Wasteful" Labor 87
  • Part Three - The Health Services Industry 107
  • 7 - Capital and Labor: Restructuring Health Services 109
  • 8 - Changing Hospital Work 134
  • 9 - Changing Home Care 154
  • 10 - The Home as Workshop: Amateur Nursing -- Medical Caregivers 178
  • 11 - Conclusions 204
  • Appendix, Notes, References, and Index 221
  • Appendix 223
  • Notes 231
  • References 241
  • Index 269
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 273

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.