Unpaid Professionals: Commercialism and Conflict in Big-Time College Sports

By Andrew Zimbalist | Go to book overview

CHAPTER SIX
Commercial Connections

Nike hasn't called and told us when to start our games. Athletes don't miss classes because of Nike. If intercollegiate athletics has sold its soul, it wasn't to shoe and apparel companies. They sold it a long time ago, to television.

Joe Roberson, Athletic Director at the University of Michigan until August 1997

Yes, I fear for where this is going. If corporate America keeps involving itself with amateur athletics, if we keep allowing companies to own the schools, then you're going to be in trouble.

Sonny Vaccaro, the architect of Nike's recruitment/endorsement network

A tax-deductible donation to the MAC entitles a member to a long list of benefits… MAC accepts contributions by various methods: cash, securities, real estate, personal property, wills/trusts, life insurance, and matching gifts from employers…. Members of MAC receive priority on their purchase of football and basketball tickets. Seats are assigned according to the level of contribution…. A $3,000 contribution could earn a Director's Club status for one year, or a Gold Club for five years.

1996 Promotional Brochure of the Mountaineer Athletic Club [MAC] of the University of West Virginia

The Goal Line Club (GLC) is a service organization that exists for the sole purpose of promoting and supporting the University of Minnesota Football Program….GLC members assist the University of Minnesota Football Program in securing summer jobs for student athletes…. GLC members organize a luncheon held prior to every

-125-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Unpaid Professionals: Commercialism and Conflict in Big-Time College Sports
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 252

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.