Unpaid Professionals: Commercialism and Conflict in Big-Time College Sports

By Andrew Zimbalist | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT

The NCAA
MANAGING THE SYSTEM

I must say that I thought the NCAA was very fair. —Peter McPherson, President of Michigan State University, commenting on the light NCAA penalties imposed after the school was found guilty of fraud in 1997 for helping three athletes become eligible to play

We were thankful with what they gave us.

Gary Abernathy, Sports Information Director at Texas Southern University, commenting on NCAA penalties imposed in 1997 following numerous violations in several sports going back five years

The NCAA is so mad at Kentucky they're gonna give Cleveland State two more years' probation.

Jerry Tarkanian, head basketball coach at Fresno State University, remarking on a common perception that the NCAA makes exemplary penalties of athletically less important schools and treats the big-time schools with kid gloves

JUST as the Bible distinguishes between venial and mortal sin, the NCAA has two categories of infractions: secondary and major. And just as God created night and day, the NCAA Manual in Article 17, Section 1, Subsection 5 provides humanity with a “Definition of Day”: “A day shall be defined as a calendar day (i.e., 12:01 A.M. to midnight). Adopted 1/10/91,” leaving one to wonder how “Genesis” could have been written before the NCAA Manual.

One might think that with 964 schools, 3 volumes, and 1,268 pages of rules and regulations, and an annual budget of $283 million, the NCAA might have more than 15 investigators looking into infractions by its member schools. The budget of its enforcement staff is not

-173-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Unpaid Professionals: Commercialism and Conflict in Big-Time College Sports
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 252

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.