History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the Mckinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 1

By James Ford Rhodes | Go to book overview

HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES

CHAPTER I

My design is to write the history of the United States from the introduction of the compromise measures of 1850 down to the final restoration of home rule in the South twenty-seven years later. This period, less than a generation, was an era big with fate for our country, and for the American must remain fraught with the same interest that the war of the Peloponnesus had for the ancient Greek, or the struggle between the Cavalier and the Puritan has for their descendants. It ranks next in importance to the formative period--to the declaration and conquest of independence and the adoption of the Constitution; and Lincoln and his age are as closely identified with the presetvation of the Union as Washington and the events which he more than any other man controlled are associated with the establishment of the nation. The civil war, described by the great German historian whose genius has illuminated the history of Rome as "the mightiest struggle and most glorious victory as yet recorded in human annals,"1 is one of

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1
History of Rome, Mommsen, vol. iv. p. 558.

-1-

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History of the United States from the Compromise of 1850 to the Mckinley-Bryan Campaign of 1896 - Vol. 1
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page *
  • Preface i
  • Contents of the First Volume iii
  • Chapter I 1
  • Chapter II 99
  • Chapter III 199
  • Chapter IV 303
  • Chapter V 384
  • Chapter VI - Pierce's Administration 507
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