Losing to Win: The 1996 Elections and American Politics

By James W. Ceaser; Andrew E. Busch | Go to book overview

Notes
1.
See Richard J. Carroll, "Clinton's Economy in a Historical Context, or Why Media Coverage on Economic Issues is Suspect," Presidential Studies Quarterly 26 ( Summer 1996): 828-834.
2.
Clinton's approval ratings remained remarkably constant throughout the first three years of his presidency. There were, of course, variations, from a low of 38 percent to a high of 60 percent. But he kept returning to a range from the mid to high 40s, and his average showed less variation than any President since Franklin Roosevelt, though Roosevelt's average was much higher (cited by Lyn Ragsdale, "Roundtable: The 1996 Presidential Election," annual meeting of the Western Political Science Association, San Francisco, California, March 15, 1996).
3.
Charles Krauthammer, "A President for Our Time," Washington Post, July 5, 1996, A15.
4.
See Kenneth T. Walsh, "Coming of Age," U.S. News & World Report, September 2, 1996, 22-27; Michael Barone and Grant Ujifusa, The Almanac of American Politics 1996 ( Washington, D.C.: The National Journal, 1995), xxxvii.
5.
" Transcript of President's Address on the Economy," New York Times, February 16, 1993, A14.
6.
Quoted in Bob Woodward, The Agenda: Inside the Clinton White House ( New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994), 165.
7.
Michael Barone, "His Problem: Indifference, Not Hate," U.S. News & World Report, August 16, 1993, 37.
8.
Robert Pear, "Congress Asserts Health Proposals Understate Costs," New York Times, February 9, 1994, A1.
9.
Alison Mitchell, "Despite His Reversals, Clinton Stays Centered," New York Times, July 28, 1996, All.
10.
Theda Skocpol, "The Rise and Resounding Demise of the Clinton Plan," Health Affairs ( Spring 1995): 67.
11.
Jon Healey, "Clinton Success Rate Declined to a Record Low in 1995," Congressional Quarterly Weekly Report, January 27, 1996, 193.
12.
Mitchell, "Despite His Reversals," A10.
13.
See Douglas Jehl, "Clinton Delivers Emotional Appeal on Stopping Crime," New York Times, November 14, 1993, A1; " Excerpts from Clinton's Speech to Black Ministers," New York Times, November 14, 1993, A24.
14.
See Dale Russakoff, "Gingrich Vows Cooperation," Washington Post, November 9, 1994; Dan Balz, "Clinton, GOP Leaders Offer Cooperation," Washington Post, November 10, 1994; David Broder, "Vote May Signal GOP Return as Dominant Party," Washington Post, November 10, 1994; Edward Walsh, "Democrats Wonder Whether Sea Change Is Plea for Centrism," Washington Post, November 10, 1994.
15.
See David S. Broder, "Sharp Turn to the Right Reflects Doubts about Clinton, Democrats," Washington Post, November 9, 1994; Walsh "Democrats Wonder Whether Sea Change"

-53-

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Losing to Win: The 1996 Elections and American Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Losing to Win *
  • To Mindy and Blaire *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter 1 - Greater Dooms Win Greater Destinies 1
  • Notes 24
  • Chapter 2 - The Two Clinton Presidencies 27
  • Notes 53
  • Chapter 3 - The Republican Nomination 57
  • Notes 86
  • Chapter 4 - In the Doledrums: the Interregnum from March to September 89
  • Notes 115
  • Chapter 5 - The Congressional Elections 119
  • Notes 145
  • Chapter 6 - The Presidential Election and the New Era of Coalitional Partnership 149
  • Notes 172
  • Appendix 1 - Presidential Vote by State, 1996 175
  • Index 177
  • About the Authors *
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