Losing to Win: The 1996 Elections and American Politics

By James W. Ceaser; Andrew E. Busch | Go to book overview

tral feature of our electoral politics and an invitation to the formation of negative coalitions that reinforce the incrementalist bent of our institutions. For now the decisive bloc of American voters, convinced with Madison that government is not inhabited by angels, seems content to insist with him that ambition be made to counteract ambition.


Notes
1.
Based on 1996 polling data, political analyst Paul Starobin argued just before Election Day that voters were less "angry" than in 1992 or 1994, but had not totally overcome the anxiousness that characterized them in the early 1990s. National Journal, November 2, 1996, 2339-2342.
2.
In a March 1996 New York Times poll, 46 percent of Democrats and 40 percent of Republicans said they would like to see a third-party candidate enter the race. Richard L. Berke, "With Dole Cashing In, Both Sides Say All Bets Are Off for Fall," New York Times, March 14, 1996, B11.
3.
Charles Krauthammer, "It's the Campaign, Stupid," The Weekly Standard, November 18, 1996, 13.
4.
Richard Morin and Mario A. Brossard, "Poll: Knew Early, Knew Enough," Washington Post, November 15, 1996, A1.
5.
For an account of the campaign's last few days, see " Bridge to 2000: The Last Lap," Newsweek, November 18, 1996, 120.
6.
CNN/TIME AllPolitics Vote '96, November 6, 1996.
7.
San Diego Union Tribune, November 17, 1996.
8.
The Hotline, November 8, 1996, 6. There is substantial academic literature arguing this case in general, for example Ruy A. Teixeira, The Disappearing American Voter ( Washington, D.C.: Brookings, 1992); Stephen Ansolabehere and Shanto Iyengar, Going Negative: How Attack Ads Shrink and Polarize the Electorate ( New York: The Free Press, 1995).
9.
" TV Ratings, Final Chapter: Election is a Turnoff," The Hotline, November 8, 1996, 6.
10.
Ibid.
11.
Martin Walker, "Yawn Away From Victory," The Observer, October 6, 1996, T17.
12.
For a presentation of the results of the polls in 1996, along with a thought-provoking discussion of their performance and the possible effects, see Everett C. Ladd, "The Pollsters' Waterloo," Wall Street Journal, November 19, 1996, A22.
13.
See " What Voters Said Election Day," The Public Perspective, January/ February 1993, 90.
14.
The data presented here are from the CNN/Time poll. Poll figures in this chapter for the 1996 election are taken from either the CNN/Time poll or

-172-

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Losing to Win: The 1996 Elections and American Politics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Losing to Win *
  • To Mindy and Blaire *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Chapter 1 - Greater Dooms Win Greater Destinies 1
  • Notes 24
  • Chapter 2 - The Two Clinton Presidencies 27
  • Notes 53
  • Chapter 3 - The Republican Nomination 57
  • Notes 86
  • Chapter 4 - In the Doledrums: the Interregnum from March to September 89
  • Notes 115
  • Chapter 5 - The Congressional Elections 119
  • Notes 145
  • Chapter 6 - The Presidential Election and the New Era of Coalitional Partnership 149
  • Notes 172
  • Appendix 1 - Presidential Vote by State, 1996 175
  • Index 177
  • About the Authors *
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