More Than Merkle: A History of the Best and Most Exciting Baseball Season in Human History

By David W. Anderson | Go to book overview

2 The Game in 1908 Dead Ball Era Baseball

Baseball is a simple yet complex game. Its charm and appeal lie in its combination of simplicity and complexity, allowing fans to appreciate the game on many levels. This relationship between the elementary and complicated has led some to say baseball is like church. Many attend but few understand.

The game and its measurements of success and failure have remained essentially the same through the years; only the participants, environment, and equipment have changed. A late-twentieth-century fan would easily recognize the 1908 game and its overall strategy, but there were still differences separating the Dead Ball Era game from that of modern times.


BALLPARKS AND FANS

Examination of the 1908 season starts with the trip to the ballpark. Chances are you arrived for the afternoon game via horse-drawn carriage, streetcar, or urban railroad, or even on foot, because the ballparks of the day were within urban neighborhoods. A major difference between attending a modern game and one of the Dead Ball Era was how you got there. Today's fans usually drive and park near the stadium. In 1908 you drove if you were among the elite, or the daring. Mass production and availability of the automobile were still some years

-10-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
More Than Merkle: A History of the Best and Most Exciting Baseball Season in Human History
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • More Than Merkle *
  • Contents *
  • Illustrations *
  • Tables *
  • Foreword xi
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Introduction xvii
  • 1 - Baseball Turned Upside Down the 1906 World Series 1
  • 2 - The Game in 1908 Dead Ball Era Baseball 10
  • 3 - The Teams of 1908 a Look at the Players 35
  • 4 - The Men in Blue the Umpires of 1908 87
  • 5 - April the Best Hopes of Fans 105
  • 6 - May the Makings of a Pennant Race 115
  • 7 - June the Race is On 127
  • 8 - July Gain the Edge 137
  • 9 - August the Storm Clouds Gather 150
  • 10 - September All Hell Breaks Loose 164
  • 11 - October Down to the Wire 184
  • 12 - Scandals of 1908 Delayed Reckoning 210
  • Appendixes - The Record of 1908 225
  • Notes 241
  • Bibliographic Essay 251
  • Index 255
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 271

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.