The Color of School Reform: Race, Politics, and the Challenge of Urban Education

By Jeffrey R. Henig; Richard C. Hula et al. | Go to book overview

CHAPTER EIGHT
School Reform As If Politics and Race Matter

STUDENTS OF AMERICAN education have long recognized the various roles played by schools in serving the national interest. They act as venues for socializing our youth into dominant norms, preparing future citizens to serve as informed voters and political actors, and training future workers in the skills and habits that our economy requires. However, schools are most often seen as vehicles of individual advancement. Few symbols are quite as powerful as education's potential role in promoting social and economic mobility. Indeed, this prescription is often offered as a broad strategy for disadvantaged populations. Minority communities are routinely advised to invest in education as a means to improve their status. In all social classes parents admonish their children to work hard in school so that they might be more successful in later life.

Given this widespread belief in the power of education, it is hardly surprising that many in the African-American community were eager first for meaningful participation and then control over urban schools. Within the AfricanAmerican community there was a general sense that white-dominated school systems were inattentive and poorly equipped to deal with the needs of minority youth. There was an almost naive faith that if African Americans could assume positions of authority within and outside the classrooms, then what had often been a hostile environment for minority children would now be restructured to better meet their needs. Underlying this anticipation was continued belief in the central role of schools. At issue was not so much the potential value of education—which was taken for granted among both blacks and whites—but rather how schooling was actually being provided to African-American children under the existing regime.

Atlanta, Baltimore, Detroit, and Washington provide dramatic illustrations of the disappointment that followed the assumption of power by African Americans in local education. Inconsistencies and inadequacies among the available measures of educational performance make it impossible to offer precise comparisons across school districts. And, it is especially difficult to make clear-headed assessments of school performance that take into account the known fact that it is much more difficult to succeed when children come to school already depleted in many ways due to the socioeconomic conditions in their families and communities. Although some might wish to argue that these schools are doing as well as they can under the circumstances, it is

-273-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Color of School Reform: Race, Politics, and the Challenge of Urban Education
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 301

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.