SUGGESTED READINGS

This final chapter contains suggestions for further reading. (Since the book contains no footnotes, when the main text has specifically borrowed from some particular work, that will be noted here as well.) I have tried to make some suggestions for each of the topics discussed in the book, but I have not attempted anything like complete bibliographies; the references that follow are highly selective. It should also be borne in mind that for the most part the works mentioned here were written by professional philosophers for professional philosophers, so many of them will make for rather difficult reading.

Individual works are referred to by author and title; more complete bibliographical information can be found in the References section.


Chapter 1: Preliminaries

1.1. What Normative Ethics Is

A standard (although somewhat dated) treatment of the problems of metaethics can be found in Brandt, Ethical Theory. On the particular issue of whether or not there are moral facts, a useful selection of recent articles can be found in Sayre- McCord, Essays on Moral Realism. Good examples of applied ethics can be found in Singer, Practical Ethics (a single, sustained work), and in the following anthologies: Regan, Matters of Life and Death; Sterba, Morality in Practice; and Rachels, Moral Problems.

For the thesis that metaethics and normative ethics are independent of one another and that philosophers should be concerned solely with the former, see Ayer, Language, Truth and Logic, chapter 6.

Given the focus of the book, many topics in moral philosophy will not be considered here. Rachels, The Elements of Moral Philosophy, is a very clear and readable introduction to the field that also treats several issues I will not be discussing at all; Feldman, Introductory Ethics, covers much of the same material at a slightly more advanced level. For something far more inclusive, A Companion to Ethics (edited by Singer) is a collection of almost fifty essays covering the scope of moral philosophy. Finally, the Encyclopedia of Ethics (edited by Becker and Becker) has entries for hundreds of issues in moral philosophy.

One of the most important topics I won't discuss involves questions surrounding free will and responsibility, and praise and blame. Some good works here are Wolf,

-305-

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Normative Ethics
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page v
  • Contents ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • 1 - Preliminaries 1
  • Part One - Factors 23
  • 2 - The God 25
  • 3 - Doing Harm 70
  • 4 - Other Constraints 106
  • 5 - Further Factors 153
  • Part Two - Foundations 187
  • 6 - Teleological Foundations 189
  • 7 - Deontological Foundations 240
  • Suggested Readings 305
  • References 321
  • About the Book and Author 329
  • Index 331
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