Eating Disorders: Obesity, Anorexia Nervosa, and the Person Within

By Hilde Bruch | Go to book overview
continuous vomiting played havoc with her electrolytes, that her twitching and muscle cramps were related to this. She willingly took medication to compensate for it. She thus differed from patients with true anorexia nervosa, particularly in not being delusional about her body and its functions, but resembled them insofar as she became increasingly isolated, not participating in any social activities.The observations reported here run counter to the whole campaign against overweight which, in fact, says exactly the opposite: that reducing is necessary to improve one's physical health, social position, and emotional outlook. These arguments are used daily to convince fat people that they should reduce. It seems to me necessary to point out that a mechanical approach to overweight carries grave mental health hazards. The road of propagating scientific standards of nutrition is littered with landmarks of overly zealous errors and failures. It is my impression that the over eager propaganda about reducing diets, even though obesity is an abnormal state of nutrition, overlooks a basic human problem, the need for satisfaction of vital needs. "The best women are rich and thin" may be a good slogan for the jet set; it is a potentially dangerous ideal for the ordinary overweight person.
BIBLIOGRAPHY
1. Bellow, S., Mr. Sammler's Planet, The Viking Press, New York, 1969.
2. Binswanger, L., Der Fall Ellen West, Schweiz. Arch. Neurol. Psychiat., 54:69-117, 1944.
3. Heckel, F., Les grandes et petites obésités, Mason et Cie, Paris, 1911.

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Eating Disorders: Obesity, Anorexia Nervosa, and the Person Within
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Acknowledgments vii
  • Contents ix
  • Part I - General Aspects 1
  • 1 - Orientation and Point of View 8
  • 2 - Historical and Sociocultural Perspectives 23
  • 3 - Biological Basis of Eating Disorders 42
  • 4 - Hunger Awareness and Individuation 64
  • 5 - Family Frame and Transactions 86
  • 6 - Body Image and Self-Awareness 104
  • Part II - Obesity 107
  • 7 - Diversity of Clinical Pictures 132
  • 8 - Obesity in Childhood 150
  • 9 - Obesity in Adolescence 174
  • 10 - Obesity and Schizophrenia 193
  • 11 - Thin Fat People 208
  • Part III - Anorexia Nervosa 209
  • 12 227
  • 13 250
  • 14 - Primary Anorexia Nervosa 284
  • 15 - Anorexia Nervosa in the Male 304
  • Part IV - Treatment 307
  • 16 - The Practical and Psychological Aspects of Weight Change 333
  • 18 - Outcome and Outlook 387
  • Index 389
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