Fat of the Land: Garbage in New York: The Last Two Hundred Years

By Benjamin Miller | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 4
Enemies

John Purroy Mitchel was the epitome of the ambitious young reformer. Like McClellan, he had a family background in politics and civil warfare (his uncle, Henry Purroy, along with Andy White, was disciplined by Richard Croker for perceived disloyalty, which led them both to team up with W. R. Grace's County Democracy before returning to the Tammany fold; his grandfather, John Mitchel, was an organizer of the 1848 Irish rebellion; two uncles died defending the Union against foes such as his father, a Confederate captain). His tastes and aptitudes matched his family's bellicose reputation: like Reynolds, he loved boxing, a sport in which he had been welterweight champion while at Columbia, and he was an avid collector of handguns who never went anywhere without one. When he was twenty-eight, Mayor McClellan (then in his anti-Tammany second term) asked him to investigate the borough president of the Bronx; Mitchel's relentless prosecution ended with the removal from office of three of the five borough presidents, and charges that would have removed a fourth had not his term already been completed. His renown from this work made him president of the Board of Aldermen when he was thirty. By the time he was thirty-four, in 1913, he was mayor.

At first Hearst was one of the young mayor's supporters. He found in Mitchel's pronouncements on the municipal ownership question symptoms of mutual sympathy and good copy in his attacks on municipal corruption. But the honeymoon was short-lived. Some said Hearst's enmity began when Mitchel refused to appoint his wife to a mayoral commission: however the feud started, both soon had more reasons for continuing it.

One reason was Mitchel's relationship with Billy Reynolds, who had become one of the mayor's closest companions. As two prominent players in the workings of municipal government ( Mitchel, for instance, sat on the Board of Estimate when Reynolds first offered to sell his burned-out Dreamland to the city), they had known each other for years. With Mitchel's elevation to

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Fat of the Land: Garbage in New York: The Last Two Hundred Years
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Fat of the Land - Garbage in New York the Last Two Hundred Years *
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Chronology xiii
  • Prologue Garbarge *
  • Part I - Engineering Reform *
  • Chapter 1 - The Greatest Happiness *
  • Chapter 2 - Grease *
  • Part II - Expanding Opportunities *
  • Chapter 3 - Friends *
  • Chapter 4 - Enemies *
  • Part III - Public Work *
  • Chapter 5 - Roads and Rails *
  • Chapter 6 - Bridges and Tunnels *
  • Chapter 7 - Parks and Parkways *
  • Chapter 8 - Ports and Airports *
  • Part IV - Landscape Sculpture *
  • Chapter 9 - Citizens and Scientists *
  • Chapter 10 - Taking Heat *
  • Chapter 11 - Two Paths *
  • Chapter 12 - Waste Management *
  • Chapter 13 - Hauling Biomass *
  • Epilogue - Pee-Yew Choo Choo *
  • Notes *
  • Illustration Credits *
  • Index *
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 414

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.