Advances in Developmental Psychology - Vol. 2

By Michael E. Lamb; Ann L. Brown | Go to book overview

Preface

This volume is the second in a new series designed, as the name implies, to survey in thoughtful detail important new strides in developmental psychology. In selecting the chapters to appear in this volume, we first identified those researchers whose recent work has provided or promises to provide new understanding of the processes and course of development across the life span. Each of the researchers so identified was then invited to prepare a manuscript describing the research and its theoretical implications. These manuscripts were reviewed by the editors and several consultant experts and were then revised by the authors in the light of this feedback. As a result, the chapters present exceptionally valuable perspectives on those aspects of developmental psychology exhibiting significant recent progress.

Readers might find it valuable if we articulated the philosophy that guided the preparation of this volume and will guide the preparation of later volumes in the series. First and foremost, the "advances" worthy of treatment in our series must involve methodologically appropriate empirical work that has clear and significant implications for the understanding and conceptualization of developmental process. The processes we wish to elucidate are not those that were central to "experimental child psychology"--they are processes that facilitate explanations of development across the life span. The emphasis on heuristically significant endeavors is evident in each of the chapters in this volume. The authors all present theoretical frameworks that provide testable predictions whose verification or refutation is likely to clarify the nature and process of development. Finally, we have sampled from a diverse array of areas in developmental psychology--not simply the traditional areas of social and cognitive development. In this and in future volumes, we include chapters concerned with atypical

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