Authoritarianism in Latin America since Independence

By Will Fowler | Go to book overview

Preface

Having concentrated over the past five years on the political role of the Mexican general José María Tornel y Mendívil ( 1794-1853) and by default the part General Antonio López de Santa Anna played in independent Mexico, I inevitably became obsessed in trying to understand how such an infamous caudillo had succeeded in rising to power so often. In the words of Enrique González Pedrero, "Where was everybody else? Why did they not stop him? How was it possible for there to be such a complicity between actions and omissions; a complicity which paralyzed the Mexicans and turned Mexico into one man's nation?" ( E. González Pedrero, País de un solo hombre: El México de Santa Anna, ( Mexico City: Fondo de Cultura Economica, 1993, p. xlv) These questions on political longevity, resilience, and endurance appear to be applicable not only to Santa Anna but also to almost all of the dictators who have dominated the history of Latin America since independence. At a time when most of Latin America's long standing dictatorships are in fact allowing certain transitions to democracy to take place it seems apt to reconsider the reasons why authoritarian regimes and leaders have been so successful in Latin America's past. Since various scholars are currently reexamining the success of authoritarianism in Latin America's history, I believe that we can benefit from discussing our work and establish possible parallels from independence to the present. Therefore, I organised a symposium entitled "Dictators and Authoritarianism in Latin America from Independence to the Present," which was held at the University of Liverpool during the annual conference of the Society for Latin American Studies (SLAS), March 25-27, 1994. This volume is the result of the symposium.

-ix-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Authoritarianism in Latin America since Independence
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 170

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.