The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History

By Norma Broude; Mary D. Garrard | Go to book overview

NOTES ON THE CONTRIBUTORS

MARILYNN LINCOLN BOARD is Assistant Professor of Art History at the State University of New York, Geneseo. Her other publications include articles on G. F. Watts, Alice Neel, and Nancy Spero. Two books in progress explore the iconography of Spero and Watts.

PETER BROOKS is Tripp Professor of Humanities and Director of the Whitney Humanities Center at Yale University, where he teaches in the departments of French and Comparative Literature. He is the author of The Novel of Worldliness (1969), The Melodramatic Imagination (1976; paperback reprint, 1985), and Reading for the Plot (1984; paperback reprint, 1985). His latest book, Storied Bodies, a study of narrative and the body, is in press. His articles and reviews have appeared in such periodicals as The New York Times Book Review, Critical Inquiry, and Times Literary Supplement.

NORMA BROUDE, Professor of Art History at The American University in Washington, D.C., is the author of The Macchiaioli: Italian Painters of the Nineteenth Century (1987), Impressionism, A Feminist Reading: The Cendering of Art, Science, and Nature in the Nineteenth Century (1991), and Georges Seurat (1992). In addition to the present volume and Feminism and Art History (1982), both co-edited with Mary D. Garrard, she has also edited and contributed to Seurat in Perspective (1978) and World Impressionism: The International Movement, 1860-1920 (1990; editions in English, French, German, and Italian). She is currently General Editor of The Rizzoli Art Series.

MARGARET D. CARROLL. Associate Professor of Art History at Wellesley College, has published several articles on aspects of Rembrandt, and on peasants and politics in the sixteenth century. She is currently writing a book, Paradigms of Power: Gender Imagery and Political Theory in European Art.

MARY ANN CAWS is Distinguished Professor of French and Comparative Literature at the Graduate School of the City University of New York, and co-director of the Henri Peyre Institute for the Humanities. Among her many books are The Poetry of Dada and Surrealism, The Eye in the Text: Essays in Perception, The Metapoetics of the Passage: Architextures in Surrealism and After, Reading Frames in Modern Fiction, and most recently, The Art of Interference: Stressed Readings in Visual and Verbal Texts. She is past president of the Modern Language Association and of the American Comparative Literature Association.

CAROL DUNCAN is Professor of Art History in the School of Contemporary Arts, Ramapo College of New Jersey. She has published numerous articles on a variety of aspects of modern art, from the eighteenth through twentieth centuries, and on the art museum, virtually all of which have been anthologized. Her influential social and feminist analyses will soon appear in a collected edition of her writings, to be published by Cambridge University Press. A book on the art museum, Civilizing Rituals: A Study of Public Art Museums is also in progress.

YAEL EVEN, Assistant Professor of Art History at the University of Missouri at Saint Louis, has published articles and reviews on aspects of Italian Renaissance art. In her recent work and work in progress, she has examined the relationship between Ghiberti and Brunelleschi, Michelangelo's images of women, images of women by male and female artists, and the heroine as hero.

TAMAR CARB is Lecturer in History of Art at University College of the University of London. She has published Women Impressionists (1986), The Correspondence of Berthe Morisot with Her Family and Friends (ed., with Kathleen Adler, 1986), and Berthe Morisot (with K. Adler, 1987). Her published and forthcoming articles concern Berthe Morisot, Marie Bashkirtseff, women artists and the nude, and issues of gender and representation.

MARY D. GARRARD is Professor of Art History at The American University, Washington, D. C. She is the au

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Expanding Discourse: Feminism and Art History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 518

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.