The Army and Economic Mobilization

By R. Elberton Smith | Go to book overview

CHAPTER III War Department Procurement Planning

The Preparation of Specific Procurement Plans
In their procurement planning activities throughout the 1920's and 1930's, the successive Assistant Secretaries attempted as thorough a program as available funds and personnel would allow. Early in the program the procurement planning function was seen to possess two major objectives: (1) the development of specific and detailed plans for the procurement of all important items for which the War Department had procurement responsibility; (2) the formulation of general policies, procedures, and organizational plans for the effective conduct of a wartime procurement program. The specific procurement plans were developed by the several supply arms of the Army within the framework of the general procurement policies laid down by the Planning Branch. These in turn were meshed with the broad plans for nationwide industrial mobilization. All plans were, so far as possible, kept up to date and responsive to current estimates of military requirements based on the latest staff plans for troop mobilization. Finally, it was taken for granted that the actual procurement of munitions in time of war, as in peacetime, would be accomplished by the established military procuring agencies.The task of devising realistic plans for producing vast quantities of specific munitions was conceived as requiring a "cradle- to-the-grave" type of planning which would--for all important items--anticipate and prepare for every step in the procurement process. Because of statutory limitations on the allowable number of planning personnel and in order to reduce to mare ageable proportions the burden of procurement planning upon industry as well as the government, the War Department confined its detailed planning activities to items known to present the most difficult procurement problems. In the mid-1930's the supply arms were instructed to classify all their procurement requirements into three groups:
Section I-Those items which present difficult procurement problems and require intensive formal plans.
Section II-Those items which present only minor procurement problems within the branch, and for which only informal planning is necessary.
Section III-Those items which present no procurement problems, and for which no plans are necessary.1
____________________
1
OASW Planning Br Cir 2, the basic directive for procurement planning. The first edition of Circular 2, issued on 20 July 1933, did not contain this classification. The 10 June 1938 edition refers to the three groups as "classes," but the term "section" was used throughout most of the planning period (undoubtedly to prevent confusion with the four official "classes" of Army supply as defined by Army Regulations). See also: (1) War Department Procurement Planning, par. 138; (2) Pitkin and Rifkind, "Procurement Planning inQMC"

-48-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
The Army and Economic Mobilization
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 749

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.